xtjna:

👓

xtjna:

👓

kidwithachalkboard:

lucasthevaliant:

Urgent - Please Spotlight:
I regret to tell you that Christina Fonthes - a dear friend and organiser of Rainbow Noir has been held against her will in The Congo - she was on a family holiday with her mother who has decided to have Christina ‘cured’ of her sexuality. 
Christina has managed to escape from her aunt’s house and is currently hiding out with a friend. She has access to internet and has been communicating with us via email. The next available flight is 2nd September - 5 days away! Chris needs help and protection from the British Embassy in Congo but her mother has reported her missing and therefore we need to get in contact with both the UK Home Office and UK embassy in Congo to let them know that she is in danger and that her mother is lying/the one endangering her life!!PLEASE SHARE THIS ON ALL YOUR NETWORKS. CALL, EMAIL, TWEET the British embassy on behalf of Christina - the more we call, the more attention it will bring to her case and hopefully they will act quicker in getting Christina to a safe place. HER MOTHER HAS HER PASSPORT AND TRAVELING DOCUMENTS!CHRISTINA’S LIFE IS IN DANGER. PLEASE DO AS MUCH AS YOU CAN. 
If you can help please contact @RainbowNoirMCR or @WritersofColour on twitter.
UK EMBASSY: 0871 050 5840 public.enquiries@homeoffice.gsi.gov.ukDETAILS OF THE EMBASSY IN CONGO ARE HEREhttps://www.gov.uk/government/world/organisations/british-embassy-kinshasa

Please re-tumblr this. This is an actual friend of ours and we need your help to get her home safe.

kidwithachalkboard:

lucasthevaliant:

Urgent - Please Spotlight:

I regret to tell you that Christina Fonthes - a dear friend and organiser of Rainbow Noir has been held against her will in The Congo - she was on a family holiday with her mother who has decided to have Christina ‘cured’ of her sexuality. 

Christina has managed to escape from her aunt’s house and is currently hiding out with a friend. She has access to internet and has been communicating with us via email. The next available flight is 2nd September - 5 days away! Chris needs help and protection from the British Embassy in Congo but her mother has reported her missing and therefore we need to get in contact with both the UK Home Office and UK embassy in Congo to let them know that she is in danger and that her mother is lying/the one endangering her life!!

PLEASE SHARE THIS ON ALL YOUR NETWORKS. CALL, EMAIL, TWEET the British embassy on behalf of Christina - the more we call, the more attention it will bring to her case and hopefully they will act quicker in getting Christina to a safe place. 

HER MOTHER HAS HER PASSPORT AND TRAVELING DOCUMENTS!

CHRISTINA’S LIFE IS IN DANGER. PLEASE DO AS MUCH AS YOU CAN. 

If you can help please contact @RainbowNoirMCR or @WritersofColour on twitter.

UK EMBASSY: 0871 050 5840 
public.enquiries@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk

DETAILS OF THE EMBASSY IN CONGO ARE HEREhttps://www.gov.uk/government/world/organisations/british-embassy-kinshasa

Please re-tumblr this. This is an actual friend of ours and we need your help to get her home safe.

the-exercist:

Reclaiming Fitspo: Brenda Villa

Villa is an American water polo player. Standing at 5’4” and 174 pounds, she is the shortest member of the US women’s polo team.

Born in Los Angeles, she is the daughter of Mexican immigrants. She first joined a water polo team at 8 years old, following in the footsteps of her older brother. However, since her high school did not have a girls’ team, she spent those four years on the boys’ water polo team instead. This helped her to establish a competitive attitude that contributed to her becoming a 4-time 1st team All-League member, 4-time 1st team All-C.I.F. and a 4-time All-American. She was even invited onto the Junior Olympic Team when she was 16.

While Villa attended Stanford University, she played three seasons on their polo team. In her freshman year alone (2001), she scored 69 goals and was named the NCAA Women’s Water Polo Player of the Year. In 2002 she led her team with 60 goals to win the NCAA Women’s Water Polo Championship. She was then awarded the 2002 Peter J. Cutino Award as the top female college water polo player in the United States. She graduated in 2003 with a degree in political science.

Villa joined Team USA in 1998. This means that she has participated in four Olympic Games (earning one Bronze medal, two Silver and one Gold), often scoring the most goals per game for her team. She was even made team captain of the 2005 US national team, winning a silver medal at the FINA World Championship in Montreal. When considering multiple World Championships, Pan American Games and World Cups, Villa is officially the world’s most decorated athlete in women’s water polo. 

Click here to see all #Reclaiming-Fitspo profiles.

redphilistine:

Palestinians — young and old — celebrate an indefinite ceasefire in Gaza. 26 August 2014.
angryasiangirlsunited:

Are there any angry Asian-Dutch girls here? My name is Janet. I am a Chinese girl who’s born and raised in the Netherlands.
As an Asian minority living in a white community, I can relate to your personal stories. Since I was little, I’ve been called slit-eye and “poepchinees” (translated as “poop Chinese”, which is a normal Dutch word, sadly enough). When I was 11, I started my first day at a new school. Another kid on the playground yelled “Look, a Chinese. What the hell is a Chinese doing at our [white] school?” Such a warm welcome. One time, a random guy at a party asked me about Asian women’s sideways vaginas. I was angry, but my boyfriend at the time told me to “relax”’. He told me the guy was “not a racist and actually very nice”. Well, fuck you very much. Two guys once followed me down the street and kept shouting words like konnichiwa, happy ending and ching chong.
A lot of Dutch people think racism doesn’t exist in the Netherlands. They act like this country is “post-racial”. To them, every racist remark and microagression is “just a joke, lighten up”. Someone even said it’s “typical Dutch humor”.
There’s an old Dutch children’s song called “Hanky Panky Shanghai”. It’s basically a nonsensical song that mocks Asian languages. They might as well called it the Ching Chong Song. This video  (1:14) shows little children internalizing “innocent” racism by singing it at a birthday party. The video is from 1997, but schools are still doing this. I would always cringe when they sang this at my elementary school. I didn’t understand why everyone (even the teacher) was mocking my language and my culture. The kids would pull their eyes back and say “This is how you talk right? And you don’t have to pull your eyes back, because your eyes are already slanty.” 
Last year, a Chinese contestant on Holland’s Got Talent was ridiculed by the Dutch judge. This was exactly the racist shit I encounter every day. It made me angry that the Dutch media and people dismissed the racism. To them, it’s “an innocent joke”. This was it. Enough is enough. Then, a lot happened:
I wrote an article about dealing with racism as an Asian in the Netherlands, which got published in a big Dutch newspaper (NRC). I also created the platform “Number 39 With Rice”, a Facebook-page that attracted 4,000+ likes in a few days (it may not sound much haha, but The Netherlands has a small population of only 16 million people). My platform attracted attention from the media and I was invited to a very well-known Dutch television show to talk about racism (which garnered 1 million live viewers). It felt amazing to stand up for myself and others. A month later, 39 Chinese restaurants reacted to the racism by offering a 39% discount to their menu item number 39. The Asian-Dutch community finally spoke up.
After that, I’ve got a lot of hate mail from white people who told me to “go back to my own country if I don’t like it here”. I should be able to “take a joke”. Even a few Asians told me to shut up and not cause a “stir”. Fuck that.
My biggest inspirations were my Asian-American sisters, like AAGU, Fascinasian, Angry Girl Comics, Kristina Wong and Jenny Zhang from Rookie. Although the hate crime rates in the US are much higher than in The Netherlands, to me the US is a place where minorities can stand proud and fight back. I would love to study a semester in the US en meet Asian-American sisters who are also proud and loud. We don’t have Asian organisations in the Netherlands that speak up against racism. Growing up, I’ve never had empowering Asian rolemodels. I felt lonely and blamed myself for being “too sensitive” when someone called me slit-eye. And now, on my platform, other Asians tell me they admire my fire. I feels good to be a rolemodel and inspire others to stand up for themselves. No, you shouldn’t be silent when someone mocks you language, culture and heritage. Tell them they’re rude, or re-appropriate stereotypes by telling them “Yes indeed, my mother’s maiden name is Ching Chang Chong” or “That waitress in the Chinese restaurant is my sister” (something I’ve learned from Jenny Zhang). Be ahead of the game, show them how ridiculous stereotypes are and most of all: stand proud.
After everything I’ve done for the Dutch Asian community, there are still days where I feel powerless and just want to bury my head in the sand. It sucks to deal with racism. It sucks to think about it. Till the day I die, I will encounter racist assholes. My children will have to deal with them, and their children, and so on.
Most Dutch Asians would rather be silent, suck it up and “stand above it”. But they’re not standing above it. They’re ignoring racism and rather act as the “model minority”.  Although they say they admire my guts, they do not want to stand up against racism. I feel different, as if I don’t belong with the white AND Asian people.
Yesterday, it hit me. I felt lonely as hell. I love my Dutch friends. But no matter how much they tell me they support me, they will never truly understand how it feels to be Asian in a white community. I have always been the only non-white person in my friend groups. I really need to go out there and find more Asian friends. I need my brothers and sisters. I can not fight this battle alone.
HouseOfCacophony

angryasiangirlsunited:

Are there any angry Asian-Dutch girls here? My name is Janet. I am a Chinese girl who’s born and raised in the Netherlands.

As an Asian minority living in a white community, I can relate to your personal stories. Since I was little, I’ve been called slit-eye and “poepchinees” (translated as “poop Chinese”, which is a normal Dutch word, sadly enough). When I was 11, I started my first day at a new school. Another kid on the playground yelled “Look, a Chinese. What the hell is a Chinese doing at our [white] school?” Such a warm welcome. One time, a random guy at a party asked me about Asian women’s sideways vaginas. I was angry, but my boyfriend at the time told me to “relax”’. He told me the guy was “not a racist and actually very nice”. Well, fuck you very much. Two guys once followed me down the street and kept shouting words like konnichiwa, happy ending and ching chong.

A lot of Dutch people think racism doesn’t exist in the Netherlands. They act like this country is “post-racial”. To them, every racist remark and microagression is “just a joke, lighten up”. Someone even said it’s “typical Dutch humor”.

There’s an old Dutch children’s song called “Hanky Panky Shanghai”. It’s basically a nonsensical song that mocks Asian languages. They might as well called it the Ching Chong Song. This video  (1:14) shows little children internalizing “innocent” racism by singing it at a birthday party. The video is from 1997, but schools are still doing this. I would always cringe when they sang this at my elementary school. I didn’t understand why everyone (even the teacher) was mocking my language and my culture. The kids would pull their eyes back and say “This is how you talk right? And you don’t have to pull your eyes back, because your eyes are already slanty.” 

Last year, a Chinese contestant on Holland’s Got Talent was ridiculed by the Dutch judge. This was exactly the racist shit I encounter every day. It made me angry that the Dutch media and people dismissed the racism. To them, it’s “an innocent joke”. This was it. Enough is enough. Then, a lot happened:

I wrote an article about dealing with racism as an Asian in the Netherlands, which got published in a big Dutch newspaper (NRC). I also created the platform “Number 39 With Rice”, a Facebook-page that attracted 4,000+ likes in a few days (it may not sound much haha, but The Netherlands has a small population of only 16 million people). My platform attracted attention from the media and I was invited to a very well-known Dutch television show to talk about racism (which garnered 1 million live viewers). It felt amazing to stand up for myself and others. A month later, 39 Chinese restaurants reacted to the racism by offering a 39% discount to their menu item number 39. The Asian-Dutch community finally spoke up.

After that, I’ve got a lot of hate mail from white people who told me to “go back to my own country if I don’t like it here”. I should be able to “take a joke”. Even a few Asians told me to shut up and not cause a “stir”. Fuck that.

My biggest inspirations were my Asian-American sisters, like AAGU, Fascinasian, Angry Girl Comics, Kristina Wong and Jenny Zhang from Rookie. Although the hate crime rates in the US are much higher than in The Netherlands, to me the US is a place where minorities can stand proud and fight back. I would love to study a semester in the US en meet Asian-American sisters who are also proud and loud. We don’t have Asian organisations in the Netherlands that speak up against racism. Growing up, I’ve never had empowering Asian rolemodels. I felt lonely and blamed myself for being “too sensitive” when someone called me slit-eye. And now, on my platform, other Asians tell me they admire my fire. I feels good to be a rolemodel and inspire others to stand up for themselves. No, you shouldn’t be silent when someone mocks you language, culture and heritage. Tell them they’re rude, or re-appropriate stereotypes by telling them “Yes indeed, my mother’s maiden name is Ching Chang Chong” or “That waitress in the Chinese restaurant is my sister” (something I’ve learned from Jenny Zhang). Be ahead of the game, show them how ridiculous stereotypes are and most of all: stand proud.

After everything I’ve done for the Dutch Asian community, there are still days where I feel powerless and just want to bury my head in the sand. It sucks to deal with racism. It sucks to think about it. Till the day I die, I will encounter racist assholes. My children will have to deal with them, and their children, and so on.

Most Dutch Asians would rather be silent, suck it up and “stand above it”. But they’re not standing above it. They’re ignoring racism and rather act as the “model minority”.  Although they say they admire my guts, they do not want to stand up against racism. I feel different, as if I don’t belong with the white AND Asian people.

Yesterday, it hit me. I felt lonely as hell. I love my Dutch friends. But no matter how much they tell me they support me, they will never truly understand how it feels to be Asian in a white community. I have always been the only non-white person in my friend groups. I really need to go out there and find more Asian friends. I need my brothers and sisters. I can not fight this battle alone.

HouseOfCacophony

dynamicafrica:

The What’s Underneath Project: Juliana Huxtable.

TW: Semi-nudity, descriptions of bullying and harassment.

Artist, DJ, writer, model and activist Juliana Huxtable (who was recently profiled by Dazed) sits down for StyleLikeU’s “What’s Underneath Project" to candidly and openly talk about aesthetics, style, visibility, insecurities, navigating the world as a gender-mixed black person, and some of the ways the projections of other people’s perceptions of her have affected her throughout her life.

halftheskymovement:

A feminist group based in Guangzhou, China staged an online protest against the sexual exploitation of women in the workplace, revealing a photograph with a message boldly written in red on a whiteboard behind them: “My vagina does not come free with my labor.” More words were written on the women’s thighs, reiterating: “Not freebies.” 
The campaign was in response to a recent fatal rape case involving a 20-year-old woman at a state-owned company who was asked by her boss to a dinner. She was sexually assaulted by her boss’s friend and died as a result of her injuries.“Don’t ask your staff to provide part-time escort services. Women should only be asked to provide knowledge or technical skills in the workplace, but not other things,” says Ye Haiyan, an advocate of women’s and children’s rights.
Read more via The New York Times.

halftheskymovement:

A feminist group based in Guangzhou, China staged an online protest against the sexual exploitation of women in the workplace, revealing a photograph with a message boldly written in red on a whiteboard behind them: “My vagina does not come free with my labor.” More words were written on the women’s thighs, reiterating: “Not freebies.” 

The campaign was in response to a recent fatal rape case involving a 20-year-old woman at a state-owned company who was asked by her boss to a dinner. She was sexually assaulted by her boss’s friend and died as a result of her injuries.“Don’t ask your staff to provide part-time escort services. Women should only be asked to provide knowledge or technical skills in the workplace, but not other things,” says Ye Haiyan, an advocate of women’s and children’s rights.

Read more via The New York Times.

jbaines19:




Remember TarikaBlack women also have a long history of abuse and violence at the hands of the state.Read Danielle McGuire’s At the Dark End of the Street: Black Women, Rape, and Resistancehttp://amzn.to/1m8Bkyi
 

jbaines19:

Remember Tarika

Black women also have a long history of abuse and violence at the hands of the state.

Read Danielle McGuire’s At the Dark End of the Street: Black Women, Rape, and Resistancehttp://amzn.to/1m8Bkyi
 

kokosnsse:

💙

Co-mod Natalie! If you see me at AFROPUNK say hi!

thecoalitionmag:

the hidden wardrobe of kelis by giselle defares

Only recently I witnessed the magnetism of Kelis. Sure, I bopped along to “Milkshake” and ”Bossy,” but I never delved deeper into the artist. Procrastination - or should I say utter boredom – let me into the dark abyss of YouTube videos. I found the dance scenes from Honey – the only high point in Jessica Alba’s career – and that was the point of no return. From there, I started to look for the cheesy videos of Sean Paul. One thing led to another and I stumbled upon “Trick Me” of Kelis. Here was an artist with a strong self-image who didn’t put on airs to be anything other than she really is. Or does she?

When I think of Kelis, authenticity comes to mind. Yeah, the word is flung around when it comes to most artists. What does it really entail? It’s often linked to the persona they show the world. The etymological definition of authenticity, or authentikos in ancient Greek is ‘ to refer to a first cause or origin.’ In other words, the pure form is not influenced and therefore valuable. The weight that is put upon artists to be authentic is quite paradoxical when you look at our digitally networked society which is dominated by constants streams of information, mass production and consumerism. However, when you look at the illusion of authenticity – of artists- and the inevitable tendency of conformism perhaps there is no such thing possible. Is authenticity then still applicable when it comes to the artist Kelis?

There is a sharp dichotomy between artificiality and authenticityIs the opposition between the two even real? How can you define music and the artist as authentic since its literal artificial. It’s essentially work – the music and the persona - created by the artist itself. Perhaps authenticity can be seen as an important yet dispensable theme. As an artist, Kelis seems authenticbecause she transforms her style in a constant mannerLike Kelis, we can always define who we are and we can always reinvent ourselvesKelis uses fashion as a form of expressionit’s her tool with which she is able to reveal her ambivalent feelings and tensions. In the end, does it really matter? The dichotomy between the artist and the persona can easily coexist.

Original, creative, curious: all words that describe Kelis’ body of work. She brings her fusion of music and style to a new generation with her latest album “Food”. The New York born R&B singer has been around for a while. Her beginnings in Harlem, NY perhaps explain her resistance to conformity. Kelis has a creative ethos with which she experiments, invents and transforms herself. That’s her core. In 1999, she broke out with her fabulous curly colorful mane in her first video “Caught Out There”. She has unleashed five albums, full of gems, where her sultry, raspy voice perfectly aligns with her dreamy r&b music. In her album “Food”, she combines her love of music with her love for cooking - she trained as a chef at Le Cordon Blue - and named her songs after her favorite dishes, such as the lead single “Jerk Ribs.” The multi talent even has her own show on the Cooking Channel Saucy and Sweet, that follows her life in and out of the kitchen.

In her web series Wardrobe Junkies Kelis gives us a peek - an episode is approximately two minutes- into her massive vintage (designer) closet. Her clothing choices over the years seemed chaotic and irrational but nevertheless fashionable and innovativeFashion and style can contribute towards individual freedom and in principle do not have to be coherent in their ambiguityThe enjoyable web series shows the contradictions and tensions in the wardrobe of an eccentric artist.

Let’s all succumb to the vintage power of Kelis.

Watch her series Wardrobe Junkies here

vivaillajams:

http://www.gofundme.com/JamillaOkuboParsoTuition

Hello,

My name is Jamilla Okubo. I am an Kenyan-American artist from Washington, D.C. Currently residing in New York City attending Parsons the New School for Design. I am currently a rising senior at Parsons studying Integrated Fashion Design (undergraduate), with a background in Fine Arts, and a focus on textiles and fashion design. 

I have been attending Parsons for three years now and I am getting ready to graduate this year as well as complete my senior thesis. I am currently $72,000 in debt to Parsons the New School for Design. For the past three years my mother has assisted me by  paying the remainder of my tuition with the Parent Plus Loan. My mother has borrowed $43,000 of the Direct Parent Plus loan. I still owe $12,000 for my last (senior) year at Parsons and mother and I can no longer take out Direct Plus Loans. 

I hope to be that minority student of color at Parsons, who represents the school, and inspires my younger siblings, and other minority/low-income students globally, to have the ambition and drive that I have, and not let financial issues get in the way of it.

As a minority student of color, I wholeheartedly appreciate and have taken full advantage of the amazing opportunities that I have received while being at Parsons, learning from amazing professors and peers.

I need $10, 787 to pay for the rest of my tuition for my last year at Parsons.

USAGE OF FUNDS:

-Tuition: $10,787
-School Supplies (Fabric, muslin, pattern paper, designing tools, paint, canvases, lab fees, books, fieldtrip fees)


My Senior Year Schedule
Fall 2014 (19 credits)
Entrepreneurship
Design, Self & Society
Futurism & Fashion
Silkscreening
Fashion, Illustration & Performance
Art After Apartheid

Winter: Strategies of Selling (course at FIT, 3 credits) 

Spring 2015 (18 credits)
Seminar Studio
Portfolio Strategies
4000 Level lecture course
Tailoring: Womenswear
Couture Design: Techniques
Fiction: Introduction


ABOUT ME & MY PURPOSE AS AN ARTIST:

 As a multidisciplinary artist I am able to combine my skills and knowledge to create and express myself. My artwork mainly focuses on people of the Diaspora (people of color), whom I consider my community. I use my artistic disciplines as tools to challenge myself in ways to give back to my community, educate, and empower them as well as the rest of the world.

It is my duty to remind people of color that we have such a rich culture, and that we should love ourselves and one another. I create artwork for my community, because I believe that my purpose as an artist of color is to empower and educate my community.

My artistic discipline connects me to my community by allowing me to create artwork that my community is able to enjoy, embrace, and share with others. I not only create my artwork for myself but what I express through the medium that I use, is a story that many in my community can relate to. When it comes to creating, I strongly believe in the fact that, 

“Black art controls the “Negro’s” reality, negates negative influences, and creates positive images,”

A quote by Sonia Sanchez. As an artist of color coming from a low-income, single-mother household background, I am able to speak for many in my community from both my experiences growing up as well as express the beauty and hardships of my community’s culture and history. Being able to paint allows me to create for myself but also allows my work to connect to so many from my community. That is the beauty of being an artist, being able to express shared feelings and experiences with your community, where they can also can all take something from what you create.
There is so much to learn, and from that form of inspiration and influence, I create.


RECENT INTERVIEWS:

OkayAfrica:  http://www.okayafrica.com/news/jamilla-okubo-textiles-paintings/#slide1

AADAT:  www.aadatart.com/interview-jamilla-okubo-on-her-cultural-background-creative-inspirations-and-favourite-things/

Portfolio Website www.jamillaokubo.com
Blog:  www.vivaillajams.tumblr.com
Shop my art prints here: http://aadatart.com/product-category/art-prints/jamilla-okubo/

SPREAD THE WORD TUMBLR FAMILY! I LOVE YALL!

*SIGNAL BOOST THIS PLEASEEEEE*  

A message from blackbeau-tee
Looooove your profile picture and background. You made it yourself?

Our very talented blog creator Patrick made it! snackwells

- Natalie

sonofbaldwin:

missworded:

Kym Worthy, the prosecutor who just brought charges against Theodore P. Wafer for shooting Renisha McBride, has a long history of being a total badass:
Prosecutor leads effort to test long-abandoned rape kits, brings justice to victims

Kym Worthy, the prosecutor, the BLACK WOMAN, who ensured that Renisha McBride’s murderer was brought to justice, who was PIVOTAL in ensuring that it didn’t become another George Zimmerman debacle, has a history of being an incredible advocate for actual justice, rather than the facsimile justice (injustice) America usually doles out to marginalized groups.

sonofbaldwin:

missworded:

Kym Worthy, the prosecutor who just brought charges against Theodore P. Wafer for shooting Renisha McBride, has a long history of being a total badass:

Prosecutor leads effort to test long-abandoned rape kits, brings justice to victims

Kym Worthy, the prosecutor, the BLACK WOMAN, who ensured that Renisha McBride’s murderer was brought to justice, who was PIVOTAL in ensuring that it didn’t become another George Zimmerman debacle, has a history of being an incredible advocate for actual justice, rather than the facsimile justice (injustice) America usually doles out to marginalized groups.

breakthecitysky:

Mamie (Peanut) Johnson, the only female pitcher in the history of the Negro Leagues, watches Mo’ne Davis hurl shutout in opener of Little League World Series Johnson couldn’t miss seeing the debut of a kid who is believed to be the first African-American girl to play in the 75 years of youth baseball’s most storied tournament.Let’s hear it for happy tears.

breakthecitysky:

Mamie (Peanut) Johnson, the only female pitcher in the history of the Negro Leagues, watches Mo’ne Davis hurl shutout in opener of Little League World Series

Johnson couldn’t miss seeing the debut of a kid who is believed to be the first African-American girl to play in the 75 years of youth baseball’s most storied tournament.

Let’s hear it for happy tears.

princemono:

VERIFIED FUNDRAISERS:

aforementioned #operationhelporhush: the starter’s twitterteepsring shop, amazon wishlist, paypal

and Michael Brown’s Memorial Fund

Feed the Students of Ferguson (source: starter’s twitter St. Louis Foodbank Confirmation)

i have been seeing a lot of different links for different places to donate for bail and legal fees, but i haven’t been able to find anything on whether or not the funds have actually been going towards helping out the people of ferguson so

if you know of any more please add and spread them and if in doubt remember to google first